The Arkansas Archeological Survey supports graduate students working on internship, thesis, and dissertation projects both at the Coordinating Office and at our research stations. Support is provided for assistantships paid out of our base funding and through grants or other special project funds. We also work closely with the Anthropology Department and the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Arkansas to host students who receive support through the Hester A. Davis Internship in Public Archeology and the Charles R. McGimsey III Endowment for Cultural Resource Management. Our graduate students work on a wide variety of research, preservation, and educational initiatives and thus provide valuable support for our efforts to fulfill our mission within the University of Arkansas system.

JESSICA HOWE

Jessica has been a graduate student at the University of Arkansas since August 2014. Prior to that, she was the station assistant for the Arkansas Archeological Survey’s research station at the University of Arkansas at Monticello campus. As the Survey’s graduate assistant in Fayetteville, she has been working on a database for the State Historic Preservation Office regarding archeological site eligibility for the National Register of Historic Places. Her dissertation research focus is on late prehistoric and protohistoric sites in the Central Arkansas River Valley. She will be analyzing collections from a number of sites in this region, primarily focusing on the Isgrig site (3PU15), which is located south of Little Rock.
Jessica Howe
Jessica Howe

MICHELLE RATHGABER

Michelle Rathgaber is a PhD student in the Environmental Dynamics program. Her research focuses on the New Madrid earthquakes in NE Arkansas/SE Missouri and how they may have affected life there in the Middle-Late Mississippian period (around AD1200s-AD1500s). She will be using archeological excavations at two sites (Manley-Usrey and Eaker) as well as larger-scale views of the landscape and environment of the area to try to see the effects of the large scale New Madrid earthquakes on how and where people were living. She is being funded by a Distinguished Doctoral Fellowship as well as a graduate assistantship through the Arkansas Archeological Survey.
Michelle Rathgaber
Michelle Rathgaber