The Arkansas Archeological Survey provides services and materials that can help Arkansas educators and students understand Arkansas’s past. Here are some of the ways we assist K-12 education.

Books & Handouts

We have available on our website a variety of Classroom Materials that can be used by teachers for lesson preparation or as student handouts. There are downloadable handouts on a wide range of topics about Arkansas archeology (both prehistoric and historic), Arkansas Indians, and some of the important sites and artifacts in Arkansas.
We also have several general-audience books that can help teachers by providing a solid background on Arkansas Indians and some of our state’s most interesting prehistoric cultural resources. Paths of Our Children: Historic Indians of Arkansas tells the story of the Native American tribes that have lived in Arkansas from the time of first European contact up to the present day. Rock Art in Arkansas outlines recent studies by archeologists of the painted pictographs and carved petroglyphs that are found in some parts of the state, forming one of the best concentrations of this early art form in the Southeast. Visit our Publications page for more info.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

New 5th Grade Social Studies Curriculum: Gathering, Gardening, & Agriculture

Gathering, Gardening, and Agriculture Curriculum and Web-SeriesWe encourage teachers (and anyone else who is interested!) to check back at our website later this fall. Currently in development (using grant funding from Arkansas Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and a Public Outreach Grant from the Southeastern Archaeological Conference) is a comprehensive 5th grade social studies curriculum for Arkansas’s teachers called Gathering, Gardening, and Agriculture. This curriculum will explore Native American, early Euro-American, and African-American plant use in the southeastern United States, with specific emphasis on sites in Arkansas. It will be available free to educators as credit-bearing teacher workshops hosted on our website, with a free content and activity book and web-based video series. There will be five content modules. Teaser: Many people do not know that the southeastern U.S. was one of ten independent centers of plant domestication in the world, and much of the archeological evidence of this early domestication of indigenous plants comes from right here in northwest Arkansas. This new curriculum will teach students about pre-Columbian societies and early European exploration through the common experience of food!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Websites

We have three special focus education websites that can be used by educators and students for learning. All three websites are linked from our main home page.
Indians of ArkansasThe most widely used of these has been “Indians of Arkansas,” a website that tells the stories of Native American occupation in the state from earliest times to the recent past. Using original texts, maps, and artworks, this website engages learners at all levels and covers 30,000 years of Native American history in Arkansas. Alongside the archeological “story” of Arkansas Indians, the website presents Indians’ own stories of their history as preserved in oral traditions. Most important for classroom use, it also includes writing prompts and beginner, intermediate, and advanced learning exercises that encourage students to use the material they have read and studied on the website to develop critical thinking and research and study skills.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Arkansas Novaculite"Arkansas Novaculite” is our newest educational and research website. It focuses on the long history of quarrying, toolmaking, and trade of Arkansas novaculite, a stone found in the Ouachita Mountains. Native Americans used novaculite for their chipped stone arrowheads and other tools for thousands of years, while Euro-American settlers developed an industry that quarried novaculite for whetstones. This website also includes a database for archeological researchers and learning exercises that teachers can use for reading comprehension and to reinforce the scientific information presented in the website.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Rockart in Arkansas
Rock Art in Arkansas” is a companion website to our book. It includes an image gallery, stories geared for kids, articles, and interpretations of rock art that help to explain how Native Americans used art forms to express their beliefs about the world. Other articles on this website explore some of the ways scientists and historians try to arrive at these conclusions, and the challenges that can arise when interpreting art and symbolism from a different culture.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Classroom Visits

Our professional staff are available to visit schools for talks and demonstrationsOur professional staff are available to visit schools for talks and demonstrations. On the home page of our website you can find the “schedule a speaker” button which will lead you to our contact information. We have professional archeologists at research stations in ten locations around the state, so chances are there is an archeologist near you, and they are all experienced at classroom visits. A wide range of topics are available, including Career Day presentations on the practice of archeology, talks on the prehistory and early history of Arkansas, sites and artifacts, demonstrations of early hunting and farming technology with replicated tools and weapons, Indian tribes who lived in Arkansas, the first encounters of Europeans and Indians in the state, and many others. We also sometimes arrange tours for smaller school groups of our facility in Fayetteville.
The Arkansas Archeological Survey uses the latest technology in its practice of archeology. For this reason, at the upper levels, our staff can give interesting presentations on applications of GIS and near-surface geophysical prospection to map the features of archeological sites even before we dig.
The Plum Bayou garden at Toltec MoundsWe are always developing new research, and this means our archeologists can bring new topics to the classroom. For example, some of our staff have been revisiting the old-fashioned concept of the “Ozark bluff-dwellers” and bringing a new understanding to these famous northwest Arkansas sites. Others have been developing experimental gardens to study the plants that were important to American Indians in the past. These gardens have been established at three sites around the state. Because we have projects all over the state, there is often some kind of research project we can talk about that is focused on the area where you live, bringing history alive for your students.
So check out our website, and if you would like an archeologist to visit your school, give us a call!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save